1063 sq ft reno: Removing supporting walls!

Posted on Sep 20, 2015 in work in progress

The apartment will be, eventually, an airy, open space with an unimpeded view down one side stretching from front to back right through the living room, kitchen, and dining room. To achieve that we have to remove some supporting walls … without collapsing the three storey building. A flush beam will span two thirds the width of the building. When finished, the ceiling will show no divisions where there once was a wall separating two rooms. In this way there will be no implied division in the newly opened up space.

The new flush beam is made of an engineered wood product (called LVL). It is the off-cuts from this material that I take to my shop and use to make small pieces of furniture like the book nooks.

Originally the apartment was a warren of small rooms with supporting walls dividing the space into thirds front to back.

Originally the apartment was a warren of small rooms with supporting walls dividing the space into thirds front to back.

The first step is to build temporary walls on either side of the original support wall (already removed in this photo).

The first step is to build temporary walls on either side of the original support wall (already removed in this photo).

Temporary walls support the building. The beam to be removed runs down the centre.

Temporary walls support the building.

Cutting out the joists so that the flush beam can be installed.

Cutting out the joists so that the flush beam can be installed.

Beam in place, temporary walls removed. Two temporary jacks remain while we wait for the delivery of the final post.

Beam in place, temporary walls removed. Two temporary jacks remain while we wait for the delivery of the final support post.

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